anacoluthon

I came across this word again in The Poetics of Space by Gaston Bachelard (1958, 1994 edition, Beacon Press, Boston). ‘Anacoluthon’: a syntactical inconsistency, usually in a sentence, but often used as a technique in poems. (I loved the variations, from ‘anacolutha’ as one of its plurals, to ‘anacoluthically’ as an adjective…) It made me think of the correlation between certain styles of poetry, and collage.

A few years ago I made a set of twelve small collages, almost miniature, 4″ x 5″, containing, along with images, both phrases and puzzle pieces. I’ll be putting them on the table at the upcoming Arts Carleton Place Art Show and Sale on November 28th.

This is a ‘found’ poem based on one of the collages, using the words, and descriptions of some of the images, anacoluthically…

four stages

four girls holding hands
cut from newsprint

your slotted spoon
begins its new career
Tuesday, July 29th

while pondering all this, you might consider the following:
the wrong shoe

When does
an ordinary
object
become
a work of art?

eating

Chinese

food

naked

remove this label
before using

he glares at the word ‘naked’

and then each morning
I would say
Is this the birthday party day?

A collage is something anyone can make, but it’s the decisions involved, a use of humour, imagination and poetic sense, as well as a pleasing visual arrangement that attracts me to the form. Finding a poem afterwards among these juxtapositions is the icing.

Making very small, you could say cluttered, pieces, is an opportunity to portray the immense in the small. Underlying the words about a work of art is a particular time. There is a date that might suggest questions about ‘why’. Words and images thrown together encourage us to imagine connections between them. They are put together in the spirit of fun, but accidents happen. Everything is connected.

I’ll be posting more anacolutha in the next few days before they leave home and go out into the wide scary world..

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s